Recent News

Principlism on a Pedestal: Rethinking priorities in ethics education

As I begin my career as a medical student at the University of British Columbia, I find myself in a unique position. Having already studied, worked, and researched in the field of bioethics, I have had the privilege of being exposed to a wide array of literature and perspectives that have helped me form my […]

Neuroethics Canada awarded funds to develop strategy for evaluating new treatment options for pediatric epilepsy

The National Institute of Mental Health, part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, has awarded a three-year, $750,000 grant to the team, which also includes Dr. Mary Connolly and Dr. Mark Harrison in the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Click the title to read more.

UBC-led team will develop strategy for navigating new treatment options for pediatric epilepsy

A team led by Professor of Neurology Judy Illes and Professor of Surgery Patrick McDonald will explore ethical issues confronting families and clinicians when considering new treatment options for drug-resistant epilepsy in children. Click the title to read more.

Can Zapping People’s Brains Really Reduce Violent Behavior?

A controversial new study found a noninvasive form of brain stimulation may reduce a person’s likelihood to engage in aggressive acts. But should it be used? Click the title to read more.

Balancing the Advantages of Technology With Patient Experience

Computer software is transforming much of the medical world. When it comes to computerized testing of brain health, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute scientist Dr. Julie Robillard says software designers need to do a better job of putting the emotional needs of patients first. Click the title to read more.

Understanding our patients’ experiences to provide meaningful care: Q&A with Dr. Julie Robillard

For Dr. Julie Robillard, “patient experience” encompasses everything from the treatments a patient receives, to how they access specialists and health information, to how they are engaged in their own care. Click the title to read more.

New paper offers smart guidelines for developing tech tools for older adults

“There are a lot of technology solutions that have the potential to help older adults, and people with dementia and their caregivers,” says Dr. Julie Robillard. “The problem is, most of them don’t get used. Technology that stays on the shelf doesn’t benefit anyone.” Click the title to read more.

Neurology Podcast: Reflections on Translation – Views of Participants in a Multi-Site Canadian CCSVI Clinical Trial

This Neurology® Podcast begins and closes with Dr. Robert Gross, Editor-in-Chief, briefly discussing highlighted articles from the June 12, 2018, print issue of Neurology. In the first segment, Dr. Stacey Clardy talks with Dr. Shelly Benjaminy about her paper on patients’ perspectives from the chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency clinical trial in Canada. In the second […]